14. November 2016 19 Uhr Ev. Stiftskirche Tübingen

Die jüdisch-andalusische Sängerin Françoise Atlan

Francoise Atlan hat schon auf dem marokkanischen interreligiösen "FES" gesungen, ein international beachtetes Sufi-Kultur-Festival (weitere Infos auf http://www.festivalculturesoufie.com/ ) In Tübingen wird sie hebräisch-sephardische Musik zu Gehör bringen, die sie als Frau in einer Synagoge nicht zu Gehör bringen könnte (z. B. in Strasbourg im Rahmen der Sacrées Journées).

Biographische Informationen:

Françoise Atlan is a French singer, born in a Sephardic Jewish family in Narbonne (France) 27 July 1964. Her father was a counselor native of Béjaïa, Algeria, and her mother was a pianist and a lyrical singer. Atlan surname derives via Arabic from the sephardic surname Katalan.

Endowed with a natural voice developed in her early years, she sings “nawbas” which are usually reserved for male singers. Welcomed with equal enthusiasm in Morocco (Fes, Rabat, Casablanca…), in Switzerland (Montreux, Yverdon-les-Bains…) and in France (Abbaye du Thoronet, Arsenal de Metz…), and received warm applauses in Belgrade, Tokyo and Kyoto.

She also achieved success in the USA, Japan, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Great Britain, Morocco, Tunisia, ex-Yugoslavia, Israel, and continued her research on Mediterranean repertoires. as well in the ancient occidental or in the traditional Andalusian Arabic repertoires. Nowadays, Françoise Atlan chooses to live and work in Morocco particularly in Marrakesh.

 

Considered as one of the best performers of Sephardic romance, she is a singer who possesses a quality of voice that brings greater authenticity to the music. Her performances are the result of exhaustive musicological research, and she shows the highest respect for the established traditions of the genre. Her Jewish roots led Atlan to develop a passion for traditional music, and particularly music from the Mediterranean Basin. In the traditional singing approach rather style remains to be her main consideration, less than such mechanical effect repetition.